Satoshi Nakamoto Blog
Image default
Airspy astronaut cosmonaut international space station ISS QFH quadrifilar helical antenna sdr Soyuz Space Wireless Hacks

Eavesdropping On Cosmonauts With An SDR


Usually when we hear about someone making contact with astronauts in orbit, it’s an intentional contact between a ham on the ground and one of the licensed radio amateurs on the ISS. We don’t often see someone lucky enough to snag a conversation between ground controllers and a spacecraft en route to the ISS like this.

For [Tysonpower], this was all about being in the right place at the right time, as well as having the right equipment and the know-how to use it properly. Soyuz MS-12 launched from Baikonur on March 14 with cosmonaut [Aleksey Ovchinin] and NASA astronauts [Nick Hague] and [Kristina Koch] onboard, destined for the ISS after a six-hour flight. The lucky bit came when [Tysonpower] realized that the rendezvous would happen when the ISS was in a good position relative to his home in Cologne, which prompted him to set up his gear for a listening session. His AirSpy Mini SDR was connected to a home-brew quadrifilar helical (QFH) “eggbeater” antenna on his roof. What’s nice about this antenna is that it’s fixed rather than tracking, making it easy to get on the air with quickly. After digging around the aviation bands at about 121 MHz for a bit, [Tysonpower] managed to capture a few seconds of a conversation between [Ovchinin] and Moscow Flight Control Center. The commander reported his position and speed relative to the ISS a few minutes before docking. The conversation starts at about 1:12 in the video below.

We think it’s just cool that you can listen in on the conversations going on upstairs with a total of less than $50 worth of gear. Actually talking to the hams aboard the ISS is another matter, but not a lot more involved really.

[via RTL-SDR.com]




Source link

Related posts

Russian rocket malfunctions during space station launch; crew lands safely – GeekWire

satoshi

WebSockets Embedded With The ESP8266

satoshi

Price tag to return to the Moon could be $30 billion

satoshi

NASA taps Blue Origin and 10 other companies for moon lander projects – GeekWire

satoshi

SpaceX reveals more Starlink info after launch of first 60 satellites

satoshi

Queen rocker Brian May releases space song dedicated to Ultima Thule

satoshi