Satoshi Nakamoto Blog
Image default
Uncategorized

New microscopy method provides more details about nanocomposites


Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have developed a new microscopy approach for imaging gel nanocomposites in their natural state, which will reveal more useful information about their assembly and properties.

Researchers are excited about imaging nanoparticles in poloxamers, a group of oddly-behaving polymer materials that are liquid at low temperature and a gel at higher temperatures. Because of their interesting phase behavior, these gels show promise in potentially acting as a matrix medium for arrangement of nanoparticles within these gels to obtain materials with interesting optical properties. However, currently, it is very difficult to image nanoparticles within a gel environment.

Like the old idiom “nailing jelly to a wall,” getting a close and accurate look at how these nanoparticle-and-gel systems organized themselves has proven difficult for scientists who want to learn more about their properties and how to control them.

“It’s basically a goo. It’s like honey when cold, and at warmer temperatures it sets into a something like Jello,” said Tanya Prozorov, a scientist in Ames Laboratory’s Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering. “It’s a state of matter that doesn’t lend itself well to the thin samples we use in TEM (transmission electron microscopy). Attempting to look at freeze-dried, thin-layer samples of the gel isn’t ideal; valuable information gets lost.”

Using a new approach with fluid cell scanning/transmission electron microscopy, Prozorov and her colleagues used a molecular printer to deposit miniscule (femtoliter, one quadrillionth of a liter) volumes of poloxamer combined with gold nanoparticles, and observe them under controlled temperature and humidity.

###

The research is further discussed in the paper “New approach to electron microscopy imaging of gel nanocomposites in situ,” authored by Alejandra Londono-Caleron, Skrikanth Nayak, Curtis L. Mosher, Surya K. Mallapragada, and Tanya Prozorov; and published in Micron.

Ames Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science national laboratory operated by Iowa State University. Ames Laboratory creates innovative materials, technologies and energy solutions. We use our expertise, unique capabilities and interdisciplinary collaborations to solve global problems.

DOE’s Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.



Source link

Related posts

IFA GPC 2019 highlights: Sennheiser’s superb soundbar, an AI razor and a new 8K TV

satoshi

Chrome OS: Tips, tools, and other Chromebook intelligence

satoshi

In Paris, an Age-Old Spell of Invulnerability Has Been Broken

satoshi

George R.R. Martin's First Inspiration For 'Game Of Thrones' Cracks Up Stephen Colbert

satoshi

Critics blast NY Times over ‘anti-Semitic’ cartoon & more — RT USA News

satoshi

China-owned spacecraft maker CASIC launches first of 156 satellites intended to provide internet service by 2022 to rural China and then to developing countries (Echo Huang/Quartz)

satoshi